Friday, December 11, 2009

"RISKS OF METHADONE-PRESCRIPTION DRUG INTERACTION"

The lead article in the latest issue of AT Forum discusses "Risks of Methadone-Prescription Drug Interaction." For sure, there is a very widely held belief that methadone "interactions" with other psychoactive medications can be dangerous - and it would seem that precisely the same concerns/questions apply to buprenorphine.

Is there, however, evidence to support this assumption in situations where a constant daily dosage of methadone (or buprenorphine) is being provided and tolerance to that dosage consequently exists? In other words, if a patient has been receiving, let's say, 160 mg of methadone every day, that dosage presumably will not cause sedation, respiratory depression, euphoria or any other narcotic effects with the possible exception of constipation and/or diaphoresis. So...is there any reason to believe that the maintenance dose of methadone, to which tolerance exists and which does not on its own produce any CNS-depressant effects, will potentiate the CNS effects of other substances? And to the extent one can come up with a theoretical basis for concluding this might be the case, is there any research evidence to support it?

The questions are not rhetorical, and we wrote to AT Forum in the hope that it would share them with its readers, along with whatever answers might be available. Alas, no response has been received from AT Forum. Original article referred to click here.

2 Comments:

At 11:56 PM, OpenID homelesschampions said...

THIS IS A SILENT FILM FROM 1916 ABOUT COCAINE IT'S ALSO A COMEDY IF YOU CAN BELIEVE IT WE DARE YOU TO CHECK IT OUT

Coke Enneday: The Mystery of the Leaping Fish 1916



The Mystery of the Leaping Fish is a 1916 short film starring Douglas Fairbanks and Bessie Love. In this unusually broad comedy for Fairbanks, the acrobatic leading man plays "Coke Enneday," a cocaine-shooting detective parody of Sherlock Holmes given to injecting himself with cocaine from a bandolier of syringes worn across his chest and liberally helping himself to the contents of a hatbox-sized round container of white powder labeled "COCAINE" on his desk. The movie, written by D.W. Griffith, Tod Browning, and Anita Loos, displays a surreally lighthearted attitude toward cocaine and opium. Fairbanks otherwise lampoons Sherlock Holmes with checkered detective hat, coat, and even car, along with the aforementioned propensity for injecting cocaine whenever he feels momentarily down, then laughing with delight. In addition to observing visitors at his door on what appears to be a closed-circuit television referred to in the title cards as his "scientific periscope," a clocklike sign on the wall reminds him to choose between EATS, DRINKS, SLEEPS, and DOPE.

http://www.2010homelesschampions.ca/video/leapingfish.html

 
At 7:34 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

THANKS SOUNDS INTERESTING
ROB FROM JERSEY

 

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